There is no need for endless cords, connectors and cables for every different device and model because there is HDMI: The one cable to power them all.

HDMI cables deliver audio and video between TVs, computer monitors, and other devices, ensuring you can connect in confidence and style no matter where – or what – you’re connecting.

What is HDMI?

Standing for High-Definition Multimedia Interface, HDMI cables power home theatre equipment and connect TVs, monitors and projectors to devices such as laptops, Blu-ray players, gaming consoles, set top boxes and mobile phones.

Transmitting both audio AND video signals, HDMI cables replaces a system where different cables were needed for each task.

How do they work?

HDMI cables plug into ports typically found on the back or side of devices, which are often labelled with words such as, “HDMI 1” or “Input 2”.

Sometimes you will have more devices to connect than there are HDMI ports, but don’t worry you can purchase HDMI switches to connect even more.

Male vs Female

Sometimes HDMI cords may be called “male” or “female”, which can be very confusing given the context. But these labels simply mean a “female” is the HDMI port while a “male” is the connector plug on the cable.

The 4 types of HDMI cables

Standard HDMI
  • Supports 720p or 1080i video resolutions
  • Suitable for most home applications
  • Ideal for standard TVs and DVDs that do not display higher than 1080i
Standard HDMI with Ethernet
  • Supports 720p or 1080i video resolutions
  • Suitable for most home applications
  • Ideal for standard TVs and DVDs that do not display higher than 1080i
High-Speed HDMI
  • Supports 720p or 1080i video resolutions
  • Suitable for most home applications
  • Ideal for standard TVs and DVDs that do not display higher than 1080i
High-Speed HDMI with Ethernet
  • Supports 720p or 1080i video resolutions
  • Suitable for most home applications
  • Ideal for standard TVs and DVDs that do not display higher than 1080i

Choosing the right HDMI for you

Finding the right HDMI cable depends on the devices you have. If they are not compatible – they will not work.

If you want 4K or 3D video resolution, both your TV and source device (such as set top box) need to be capable of 4K or 3D.

Check the capabilities of your devices with the capabilities of your HDMI cable to ensure they are all going to work together to deliver the best possible audio and visual experiences for you.

Small and mighty: Mini and Micro HDMI Cables

HDMI cables also come in mini and micro varieties. These do the same job – transferring audio and visual data – but are made for smaller devices such as cameras, tablets and mobile phones.

Mini HDMI cords have a smaller connector and are easily used for the smaller post of DSLR cameras, high-definition camcorders, and tablets.

Micro HDMI cables are typically found on mobile phones, cameras, and some e-readers. You can also get a Micro to regular HDMI connector which will make it possible to use the device straight to your HD TV or other HDMI compatible device.

HDMI versus DisplayPort, DVI, and VGA?

HDMI is the most commonly used audio and visual connector, and can be used on all DisplayPort, DSI and VGA devices.

DisplayPort

Originally developed to connect computers to monitors, this connector is now available on other devices such as laptops, tablets and digital TVs.

It’s a newer standard than HDMI, capable of a higher refresh rate and a more stable AV connection.

DisplayPort is not as ubiquitous as HDMI, but can be found on Apple’s iMacs and MacBooks as well as Microsoft’s Surface Pro.

DVI

Digital Visual Interface (DVI) cables are becoming less popular because they only carry video signals only, not audio, unless it’s connected with a DVI to HDMI cable or adapter.
DVI is not capable of 4K resolution.

VGA

Visual Graphics Array is a video-only connection used in older laptops, projectors and displays. Again, these are becoming less popular and are hardly seen on newer model TVs. However, if you have legacy systems or equipment VGAs are still useful.

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